North County Leader

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Balbriggan Baby Among History Makers

Balbriggan babyHistory Maker: Martina Melia from Balbriggan is pictured with her newborn baby girl Freya Grace Harran (birth weight 7lbs 14oz/3.580Kg) and midwife Rhona Drummond, MN-CMS project manager at the Rotunda Hospital

The Rotunda Hospital, Dublin, the oldest continuously operating maternity hospital in the world has become the first Dublin maternity hospital to introduce a full electronic health record (EHR) for all newborn babies and women receiving maternity services at the hospital.

Among the first newborns at the Rotunda Hospital to have their own electronic health records from birth is baby Freya Grace Harran, weighing 7lbs 14oz, born to parents Martina Melia and Paul Harran from Balbriggan.

The Maternal and Newborn Clinical Management System (MN-CMS), a national system which will be implemented in all 19 maternity units across the country, will enhance care as all patients will have an electronic record instead of a paper record, allowing clinical record information to be shared with relevant providers of care, as and when required.

Professor Fergal Malone, Master of the Rotunda Hospital, said: “We are very proud to announce that the Rotunda Hospital is the first Dublin maternity hospital and the third hospital nationally, to introduce the Maternal & Newborn Clinical Management System (MN-CMS).

“The Rotunda is the first stand-alone hospital to go completely electronic in terms of its maternity health care records, which has the potential to offer great efficiencies for patients and healthcare providers.

“We anticipate even further advances in terms of patient safety and satisfaction over and above our existing services.”
Minister for Health, Simon Harris TD, said: “I’m delighted that Ireland’s oldest maternity hospital is its newest digitally enabled hospital. This is the latest hospital to be included in the MN-CMS project, following the already successful introduction in Cork University Maternity Hospital and University Hospital Kerry.”